GluShu ~ The alternative to traditional shoeing

Not Own Photo, in process of referencing/deleting.

Traditional shoeing isn’t for everyone. I have heard of several horses over the years which, for one reason or another, could no longer be conventionally shod. These horses were too footsore for barefoot to be an option, so they had to turn to glue on shoes. For a set of glue on shoes, you are generally looking at around £200, if not higher. Which is a HUGE payout.

So when might you need to invest in glue on shoes?

  • Horse is sensitive to nailing
    – Some horses are sensitive to shoeing. This might be due to a current problem with the hoof (such as an abscess) which causes the horse pain. Or it could also be due to a previous experience of pain during shoeing.
    – These horses may become difficult to shoe and display lameness after shoeing.
  • To eliminate nailing as a possible source of lameness
    – Lameness is extremely common in horses and it can sometimes be difficult to diagnose.
    – Shoeing can occasionally be the source of lameness due to the hoof being such a complicated part of the horse. Even the best farrier can place a nail which may cause lameness. So if a vet is struggling to find the source of a lameness, they may suggest removing shoes. However, many horses will be footsore on hard ground after having their shoes removed.
    – Glue on shoes offer a temporary alternative during the diagnosis period.
  • Poor hoof conformation can make nailing tricky
    – Horses with low weak heels, contracted feet, thin soles, collapsed feet are harder to shoe than a horse with good hoof conformation
    – This is because it is harder to place the nails correctly, which can increase the risk of shoe related lameness.
    – Poor hoof conformation can usually be fixed with correct trimming and farriery over time. However, for particularly bad cases or sensitive horses, glue on shoes might be the preferred option while the remedial work is being carried out.
  • Insufficient hoof wall
    – Similar to the above reason, problems with the hoof wall also make shoeing difficult and puts the horse at higher risk of shoe related lameness.
    – Badly cracked hooves, weak hooves and other damage to the hoof structure often cannot keep shoes on and are more likely to develop problems.
    – Glue on shoes offer an alternative shoe while allowing the hoof to recover.
  • Footsore
    – many horses struggle barefoot
    – glue on shoes offer an alternative to traditional shoes for these horses
  • Traumatised hoof
    – horses with problems such as abscesses and infections often cannot wear traditional shoes, however they can usually wear glue on shoes.
  • Owner preference
    – some owners simply do not like traditional shoeing and are looking for an alternative.

A new craze on the market!

A new brand of glue on shoe has been released onto the market and it stands apart from its competition due to its huge difference in price. GluShu is a new product hitting Europe and the UK and retails at just £30 a pair.

I have never been a huge fan of Glue on Shoes but I have always been aware that for some horses, glue on shoes are the best option and if they ever became the best option for one of my horses, I would try them without a second thought.

I have been reading through the testimonies on the GluShu website and I can safely say, I never realised there was such a high demand for this type of product. There are so many owners who prefer barefoot but want to do right, which have found this product and love it. There are also lots of people with horses with varying conditions which believe this product has really changed their horses lives. However, the reviews are not just from owners, they also have reviews from farriers.

If you have any questions about how well your horse is coping with traditional shoeing or barefoot, GluShu is definitely worth a look into. Not only are they much cheaper than alternative glue on shoes, but they are becoming very popular and have the support of many professionals in the industry.

*** All Photo Credit GluShu ***

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